Malaria News

The influence of nevirapine and efavirenz-based anti-retroviral therapy on the pharmacokinetics of lumefantrine and anti-malarial dose recommendation in HIV-malaria co-treatment
HIV-malaria co-infected patients in most parts of sub-Saharan Africa are treated with both artemether-lumefantrine (AL) and efavirenz (EFV) or nevirapine (NVP)-based antiretroviral therapy (ART). EFV, NVP, artemether and lumefantrine are substrate, inhibitor or inducer of CYP3A4 and CYP2B6, which creates a potential for drug-drug interactions. The effect of EFV and/or NVP on lumefantrine pharmacokinetic profile among HIV-malaria co-infected patients on ART and treated with AL was investigated. Optimal lumefantrine dosage regimen for patients on EFV-based ART was determined by population pharmacokinetics and simulation.
25/04/2015  from Malaria Journal     Read More      Permalink
<it>Plasmodium falciparum</it> in the southeastern Atlantic forest: a challenge to the bromeliad-malaria paradigm?
Recently an unexpectedly high prevalence of Plasmodium falciparum was found in asymptomatic blood donors living in the southeastern Brazilian Atlantic forest. The bromeliad-malaria paradigm assumes that transmission of Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium malariae involves species of the subgenus Kerteszia of Anopheles and only a few cases of P. vivax malaria are reported annually in this region. The expectations of this paradigm are a low prevalence of P. vivax and a null prevalence of P. falciparum. Therefore, the aim of this study was to verify if P. falciparum is actively circulating in the southeastern Brazilian Atlantic forest remains. In this study, anophelines were collected with Shannon and CDC-light traps in seven distinct Atlantic forest landscapes over a 4-month period.
25/04/2015  from Malaria Journal     Read More      Permalink
Today on New Scientist
All the latest from newscientist.com: digital democracy, malaria vaccine, twin crimes, kinky frogs, and more
24/04/2015  from New Scientist     Read More      Permalink
World's first malaria vaccine could be rolled out by end of year
Results suggest millions of cases globally could be averted with the vaccine, which may be approved for use by year end
24/04/2015  from New Scientist     Read More      Permalink
Re-imagining the control of malaria in tropical Africa during the early years of the World Health Organization
This paper grew out of a meeting organized in October 2014 in London on ‘Re-imagining malaria’. The focus of that meeting was on malaria today; only afterwards did the idea emerge that re-imagining the past might serve as a useful way for guiding present re-thinking. Sub-Saharan Africa is the logical place for such a re-examination for, as argued in this paper, the approaches that emerged following the collapse of the global eradication campaign were available to WHO in the 1950s, but these were not pursued as Africa was not encouraged to seek solutions outside those being advocated for eradication elsewhere.
24/04/2015  from Malaria Journal     Read More      Permalink
Characterization of imported malaria, the largest threat to sustained malaria elimination from Sri Lanka
Sri Lanka has reached zero indigenous malaria cases in November 2012, two years before its targeted deadline for elimination. Currently, the biggest threat to the elimination efforts are the risk of resurgence of malaria due to imported cases. This paper describes two clusters of imported malaria infections reported in 2013 and 2014, one among a group of Pakistani asylum-seekers resident in Sri Lanka, and the other amongst local fishermen who returned from Sierra Leone. The two clusters studied reveal the potential impact of imported malaria on the risk of reintroducing the disease, as importation is the only source of malaria in the country at present.
24/04/2015  from Malaria Journal     Read More      Permalink
<it>Plasmodium vivax</it> malaria at households: spatial clustering and risk factors in a low endemicity urban area of the northwestern Peruvian coast
Peru has presented a decreasing malaria trend during the last decade, particularly in areas on northwestern coast; however, a limited number of cases continues to be reported yearly mainly in malaria hotspots. Plasmodium vivax malaria incidence is highly heterogeneous in space and time in the urban study area with important geographical and housing risk factors associated with symptomatic episodes.
24/04/2015  from Malaria Journal     Read More      Permalink
Foul wind, spirits and witchcraft: illness conceptions and health-seeking behaviour for malaria in the Gambia
As the disease burden in the Gambia has reduced considerably over the last decade, heterogeneity in malaria transmission has become more marked, with infected but asymptomatic individuals maintaining the reservoir. The identification, timely diagnosis and treatment of malaria-infected individuals are crucial to further reduce or eliminate the human parasite reservoir. This ethnographic study focused on the relationship between local beliefs of the cause of malaria and treatment itineraries of suspected cases.
24/04/2015  from Malaria Journal     Read More      Permalink
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